Tips On How To Apply For A Bursary For An Independent School

Many independent schools now pride themselves on making significant efforts towards widening access to those children who they feel would benefit from the excellent education which they provide. An inability for parents to meet the financial commitment of their termly fees should not be a deal breaker when the parents of the right child come knocking on the door of the admissions office.

So how do parents know if their child would be eligible for a bursary and once they have established this, how do they go about securing one? Our Scholarships and Bursaries guide is full of expert information to help you. On sale now for just £5.99 on our online store:

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Here are a few tips which may answer some of your questions.

‘The early bird catches the worm’.

You need to be planning ahead and asking the schools on your shortlist about bursaries at least two years in advance of your child’s proposed start date. Schools budget carefully for their bursary funds well in advance, so they are far less likely to have funds left to allocate to your child if you approach them at the last minute.

Use contacts within the independent sector to offer support your applications.

In addition to those offered by senior schools, many prep schools offer bursaries for children who they feel will benefit in terms of educational opportunity and who will contribute fully to the life of the school. Not just on the academic front, but also in music, sport, drama or The Arts. Securing a bursary for your child to attend a prep school may well mean you will have the support of your prep school head in finding and securing a bursary for a place at your chosen independent senior school.

 

Scholarships vs. bursary

Remember that scholarships are more about commendation of talent than cash. They usually equate to 10 or 20% discount to the fees. It is sometimes possible however to secure a bursary in addition to a scholarship to fill any shortfall.

 

 

 

 

State boarding schools

These offer an excellent alternative to the high cost of boarding school fees. They are able to do this, as parents only need contribute towards the boarding costs, since the tuition and education are state funded. The State Boarding Schools Association website has details of these schools and how to apply.

http://www.sbsa.org.uk/

Can the family help?

I once had a parent say to me that they did not see any point in leaving a cash inheritance to their son as they felt with a good education; he should be encouraged to make his own way in life. With this in mind, they had decided to invest his financial inheritance in his education, to give him what they believed to be the best possible foundation on which to build his own financial future. With this in mind, do you have sources of financial inheritance for example grandparents who would be able to assist with the fees? It is always worth asking, as schools will be unlikely to award you a bursary if their means testing process highlights that there is a potential source of financial support from relatives.

If at first you don’t succeed, try try and try again!

Be persistent and keep asking as your child progresses through their school career. Financial circumstances do change, especially in the current volatile job market, so if you suddenly fall upon hard times and are struggling to meet the fees commitment that you have already made, discuss this with the school to see if they are able to assist in any way.